Comment author: ThomasSittler 14 November 2016 02:02:56PM 2 points [-]

Thanks for the post! I think you are misinterpreting Hauke's comment about the Against Malaria Foundation. He said: "Malaria nets are unpleasant to sleep under, but it's much better than getting malaria. I'm not aware of any studies that measure how much of a reduction in quality of life they result in, but I imagine the effect to be quite small."

Comment author: arunbharatula 23 November 2016 10:13:47AM 0 points [-]

Thank you for your comment. Yes, upon re-reading the Hauke's post I can see that I have misinterpreted the comment.

Comment author: DavidNash 14 November 2016 12:24:02PM 1 point [-]

It seems to me there are lots of people who live below median wage with high life satisfaction and that increasing earnings could result in a smaller increase in happiness than helping inform people about the best ways to lead a satisfying life.

Do you think their is potential for more focus on how people can spend/save their money to maximise their well being? Or maybe more restrictions on advertisements and the tools they can use to promote spending?

Comment author: arunbharatula 23 November 2016 10:08:24AM 0 points [-]

Thank you for your comment and questions. In respone to your questions, I am not familiar enough with the relevant evidence-bases, academic or anecdotal to say at this time.

Comment author: arunbharatula 10 November 2016 09:39:37AM *  0 points [-]

I think this is a really good question and I have been asking it myself from from a different angle. Firstly I want to point out that finding the right literature may not so much be because of an absence of that literature - but that you may be searching for terms which are used in EA circles when the academic community uses different terms. And, different disciplines use different terms for the same or similar concepts even - further complicating things.

I'll share some of my experience and I hope others can contribute here too.

I did some RA work for an econometrician on cost-effectiveness project in a health policy, programs and economics centre at my university. It was based in the school of population health, not the business school. From my impression it is health economists (welfare economists too?) who do the closest stuff to cause prioritisation. There are established priority setting is health priority setting. And, my supervisor worked on the Global Burden of Disease project. So, you may have to find suitable supervisors working on the most cause-prioritisation-ey projects who may very well not be available at your university.

I just finished a MSc (epidemiology). Even though I ended up doing research projects with health psychologists I found that cause prioritization stuff fits better into the way epidemiology papers tend to be written than economics/econometrics papers. My supervisors did raise their eyebrows when originally cited the Open Philanthropy Project (asking what credentials they had to set the agenda in their field - given they hadn't heard of them before) but were overall open-minded. I would expect that public policy or international development papers may be even more fitting for that kind of thinking.

Comment author: arunbharatula 23 November 2016 10:04:25AM 0 points [-]
3

Psychologically informed giving

I wrote this for a blog article I wrote for a coursework subject as part of a Master of Science (epidemiology) that I just completed from the University of Melbourne. The original is hosted here . It's rather skimpy and shallow since there was a tight word limit and my... Read More
Comment author: arunbharatula 10 November 2016 10:50:33AM 0 points [-]
Comment author: arunbharatula 10 November 2016 09:44:46AM 1 point [-]

Does something count as 'from the EA community' if it is 'discovered by the EA community' where it existed elsewhere earlier? I only just discovered counterarguments to the 'logic of the larder': http://www.qalys.org/animal-welfare.pdf That might be the highest impact EA-relevant piece of info to me this year.

Comment author: ChemaCB 22 September 2016 01:44:28PM 3 points [-]

Hello all,

I'm new to the forum, and not sure if this is a an abuse of the open thread so please tell me if so. (ps. really enjoyed the Sam Harris podcast)

Can anyone help point me in the direction of academic papers using economic models for cause prioritization or other EA related pursuits?

Quick background: 80000hours.org inspired me to study economics, not because I know much about what it's like to be an economist, but mainly because I like math, I like freakonomics radio, and I want to maximize my beneficial impact.

My situation: I'm beginning my senior research project (which I hope to lead me into graduate work), and my advisors don't seem to think that EA or cause prioritization research is economic in nature. Setting aside the likely possibility that I have simply failed to adequately explain EA to them, I think what they mean is that they don't see how it could make use of economic models.

Solicitation of advice: The reason I'm reaching out is because I don't actually know what economic EA research looks like. One idea I had for my project (based in pure ignorance, I should remind you) was to do a sensitivity analysis of a cause prioritization rubric to changes in moral frameworks. In other words, if you have different moral views (which is reasonable) how different will your cause priorities be? What do you think of this research question? Surely any organization doing CPR would have already done this analysis right? Why can't I find any published literature?

Do cause prioritization researchers use models? My advisors seem to think that it's more likely to be economic pontification than modeling that dictates prioritization. Please defend my honor. :-P

Thank you so much for your time!

Comment author: arunbharatula 10 November 2016 09:39:37AM *  0 points [-]

I think this is a really good question and I have been asking it myself from from a different angle. Firstly I want to point out that finding the right literature may not so much be because of an absence of that literature - but that you may be searching for terms which are used in EA circles when the academic community uses different terms. And, different disciplines use different terms for the same or similar concepts even - further complicating things.

I'll share some of my experience and I hope others can contribute here too.

I did some RA work for an econometrician on cost-effectiveness project in a health policy, programs and economics centre at my university. It was based in the school of population health, not the business school. From my impression it is health economists (welfare economists too?) who do the closest stuff to cause prioritisation. There are established priority setting is health priority setting. And, my supervisor worked on the Global Burden of Disease project. So, you may have to find suitable supervisors working on the most cause-prioritisation-ey projects who may very well not be available at your university.

I just finished a MSc (epidemiology). Even though I ended up doing research projects with health psychologists I found that cause prioritization stuff fits better into the way epidemiology papers tend to be written than economics/econometrics papers. My supervisors did raise their eyebrows when originally cited the Open Philanthropy Project (asking what credentials they had to set the agenda in their field - given they hadn't heard of them before) but were overall open-minded. I would expect that public policy or international development papers may be even more fitting for that kind of thinking.

Comment author: arunbharatula 10 November 2016 09:28:24AM *  2 points [-]

Does anyone have questions for or information to give to World Health Organization staff at the Geneva HQ?

I'm doing an internship there and I figure I could set up a meeting to ask EA relevant questions or give EA info if it would be of interest to that staff person too.

Questions/content around country-cooperation are most appropriate, since that's the area of my internship.

Comment author: arunbharatula 10 November 2016 06:04:36AM 0 points [-]

What happened?

Comment author: arunbharatula 10 November 2016 06:03:45AM 1 point [-]

You mentioned that you asked various charities questions. Can you give an indication of how easy or difficult it was to solicit information from various organisations? And, if that appears sensitive to the wording of your messages? Thank you.

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