Comment author: Peter_Hurford  (EA Profile) 17 November 2017 03:59:58PM 2 points [-]

Yep, that is an issue. One idea might be to look at the data for each referral source (e.g., how everyone who heard about the survey through Facebook heard about EA, then how everyone who heard about the survey though SlateStarCodex heard about EA, etc.).

Comment author: Tee 17 November 2017 05:13:09PM 1 point [-]

I agree, this is something we acknowledge multiple times in the post, and many times throughout the series. The level of rigor it would take to bypass this issue is difficult to reach.

This is also why the section where we see some overlap with Julia's survey is helpful.

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EA Survey 2017 Series: How do People Get Into EA?

This is the eighth article in the EA Survey 2017 Series. You can find supporting documents at the bottom of this post, including previous EA surveys conducted by Rethink Charity , and an up-to-date list of articles in the series. Get notified of the latest posts in this series by... Read More
12

SHIC Workshop Experiment and Revised Impact Strategy 2018

By Tee Barnett and Baxter Bullock This post details our shift in priorities for the Students for High-Impact Charity (SHIC) program over time, and briefly outlines the revised methods of delivering this approach. We conclude the article by announcing a new SHIC workshop experiment slated to launch in early 2018.... Read More
Comment author: Tee 10 October 2017 05:26:09PM 3 points [-]

Additional data on EA shifts in cause area preference: http://effective-altruism.com/ea/1fi/have_ea_priorities_changed_over_time/

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EA Survey 2017 Series: Have EA Priorities Changed Over Time?

By Peter Hurford and Tee Barnett   This is the seventh article in the EA Survey 2017 Series.   You can find supporting documents at the bottom of this post, including previous EA surveys conducted by Rethink Charity , and an up-to-date list of articles in the series. Get notified... Read More
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EA Survey 2017 Series: Qualitative Comments Summary

The annual EA Survey is a volunteer-led project of   Rethink Charity that has become a benchmark for better understanding the EA community. This is the sixth article in our multi-part EA Survey 2017 Series. You can find supporting documents at the bottom of this post, including prior EA surveys,... Read More
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EA Survey 2017 Series: Demographics II

By: Katie Gertsch and Tee Barnett   The annual EA Survey is a volunteer-led project of Rethink Charity that has become a benchmark for better understanding the EA community. This is the fifth article in our multi-part EA Survey 2017 Series. You can find supporting documents at the bottom of... Read More
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EA Survey 2017 Series: Donation Data

By Huw Thomas   The annual EA Survey is a volunteer-led project of Rethink Charity that has become a benchmark for better understanding the EA community. This post is the fourth in a multi-part series intended to provide the survey results in a more digestible and engaging format. You can... Read More
Comment author: Michelle_Hutchinson 05 September 2017 09:00:44AM *  3 points [-]

Thanks for clarifying.

The claim you're defending is that the Bay is an outlier in terms of the percentage of people who think AI is the top priority. But what the paragraph I quoted says is 'favoring a cause area outlier' - so 'outlier' is picking out AI amongst causes people think are important. Saying that the Bay favours AI which is an outlier amongst causes people favour is a stronger claim than saying that the Bay is an outlier in how much it favours AI. The data seems to support the latter but not the former.

Comment author: Tee 05 September 2017 12:54:51PM 1 point [-]

I've also updated the relevant passage to reflect the Bay Area as an outlier in terms of support for AI, not AI an outlier as a cause area

Comment author: Michelle_Hutchinson 05 September 2017 09:00:44AM *  3 points [-]

Thanks for clarifying.

The claim you're defending is that the Bay is an outlier in terms of the percentage of people who think AI is the top priority. But what the paragraph I quoted says is 'favoring a cause area outlier' - so 'outlier' is picking out AI amongst causes people think are important. Saying that the Bay favours AI which is an outlier amongst causes people favour is a stronger claim than saying that the Bay is an outlier in how much it favours AI. The data seems to support the latter but not the former.

Comment author: Tee 05 September 2017 12:40:16PM 1 point [-]

Hey Michelle, I authored that particular part and I think what you've said is a fair point. As you said, the point was to identify the Bay as an outlier in terms of the amount of support for AI, not declare AI as an outlier as a cause area.

The article in general seems to put quite a bit of emphasis on the fact that poverty came out as the most favoured cause.

I don't know that this is necessarily true beyond reporting what is actually there. When poverty is favored by more than double the number of people who favor the next most popular cause area (graph #1), favored by more people than a handful of other causes combined, and disliked the least, those facts need to be put into perspective.

If anything, I'd say we put a fair amount of emphasis on how EAs are coming around on AI, and how resistance toward putting resources toward AI has dropped significantly.

We could speculate about how future-oriented certain cause areas may be, and how to aggregate or disaggregate them in future surveys. We've made a note to consider that for 2018.

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