28

geoffreymiller comments on Projects I'd like to see - Effective Altruism Forum

You are viewing a comment permalink. View the original post to see all comments and the full post content.

Comments (15)

You are viewing a single comment's thread.

Comment author: geoffreymiller  (EA Profile) 16 August 2017 09:36:00PM 2 points [-]

I agree that growing EA in China will be important, given China's increasing wealth, clout, confidence, and global influence. If EA fails to reach a critical mass in China, its global impact will be handicapped in 2 to 4 decades. But, as Austen Forrester mentioned in another comment, the charity sector may not be the best beachhead for a Chinese EA movement.

Some other options: First, I imagine China's government would be motivated to thinking hard about X-risks, particularly in AI and bioweapons -- and they'd have the decisiveness, centralized control, and resources to really make a difference. If they can build 20,000 miles of high-speed rail in just one decade, they could probably make substantial progress on any challenge that catches the Politburo's attention. Also, they tend to take a much longer-term perspective than Western 'democracies', planning fairly far into the mid to late 21st century. And of course if they don't take AI X-risk seriously, all other AI safety work elsewhere may prove futile.

Second, China is very concerned about 'soft power' -- global influence through its perceived magnanimity. This is likely to happen through government do-gooding rather than from private charitable donations. But gov't do-gooding could be nudged into more utilitarian directions with some influence from EA insights -- e.g. China eliminating tropical diseases in areas of Africa where it's already a neocolonialist resource-extraction power, or reducing global poverty or improving governance in countries that could become thriving markets for its exports.

Third, lab meat & animal welfare: China's government knows that a big source of subjective well-being for people, and a contributor to 'social stability', is meat consumption. They consume more than half of all pork globally, and have a 'strategic pork reserve': https://www.cnbc.com/id/100795405. But they plan to reduce meat consumption by 50% for climate change reasons: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jun/20/chinas-meat-consumption-climate-change This probably creates a concern for the gov't: people love their pork, but if they're told to simply stop eating it in the service of reducing global warming, they will be unhappy. The solution could be lab-grown meat. If China invested heavily in that technology, they could have all the climate-change benefits of reduced livestock farming, but people wouldn't be resentful and unhappy about having to eat less meat. So that seems like a no-brainer to get the Chinese gov't interested in lab meat.

Fourth, with rising affluence, young Chinese middle-class people are likely to have the kind of moral/existential/meaning-of-life crises that hit the US baby boomers in the 1960s. They may be looking for something genuinely meaningful to do with their lives beyond workaholism & consumerism. I think 80k hours could prove very effective in filling this gap, if it developed materials suited to the Chinese cultural, economic, and educational context.